Typography and graphic design inspiration, calligraphy, lettering. Find the best fonts and typography books suggestions.



Today is the Day Pocket Planner by Jessica Hische.
The Today is the Day pocket planner looks like those old hardcover books with gold lettered-titles.
Lettering and illustrations are byJessica Hische.
The Art Deco-inspired interior planner pages include full-page typographical illustrations of quotations by Emily Dickinson (“Forever is Composed of Nows”), Emily Bronte (“I’ve dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me”), John Gardner, Anthony D’Angelo, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and others.
The spine reminds you to “write every day”, and the back cover exhorts you to make it happen.
See the details of this beautiful book here: http://amzn.to/1eOKUCT Today is the Day Pocket Planner by Jessica Hische.
The Today is the Day pocket planner looks like those old hardcover books with gold lettered-titles.
Lettering and illustrations are byJessica Hische.
The Art Deco-inspired interior planner pages include full-page typographical illustrations of quotations by Emily Dickinson (“Forever is Composed of Nows”), Emily Bronte (“I’ve dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me”), John Gardner, Anthony D’Angelo, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and others.
The spine reminds you to “write every day”, and the back cover exhorts you to make it happen.
See the details of this beautiful book here: http://amzn.to/1eOKUCT Today is the Day Pocket Planner by Jessica Hische.
The Today is the Day pocket planner looks like those old hardcover books with gold lettered-titles.
Lettering and illustrations are byJessica Hische.
The Art Deco-inspired interior planner pages include full-page typographical illustrations of quotations by Emily Dickinson (“Forever is Composed of Nows”), Emily Bronte (“I’ve dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me”), John Gardner, Anthony D’Angelo, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and others.
The spine reminds you to “write every day”, and the back cover exhorts you to make it happen.
See the details of this beautiful book here: http://amzn.to/1eOKUCT Today is the Day Pocket Planner by Jessica Hische.
The Today is the Day pocket planner looks like those old hardcover books with gold lettered-titles.
Lettering and illustrations are byJessica Hische.
The Art Deco-inspired interior planner pages include full-page typographical illustrations of quotations by Emily Dickinson (“Forever is Composed of Nows”), Emily Bronte (“I’ve dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me”), John Gardner, Anthony D’Angelo, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and others.
The spine reminds you to “write every day”, and the back cover exhorts you to make it happen.
See the details of this beautiful book here: http://amzn.to/1eOKUCT Today is the Day Pocket Planner by Jessica Hische.
The Today is the Day pocket planner looks like those old hardcover books with gold lettered-titles.
Lettering and illustrations are byJessica Hische.
The Art Deco-inspired interior planner pages include full-page typographical illustrations of quotations by Emily Dickinson (“Forever is Composed of Nows”), Emily Bronte (“I’ve dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me”), John Gardner, Anthony D’Angelo, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and others.
The spine reminds you to “write every day”, and the back cover exhorts you to make it happen.
See the details of this beautiful book here: http://amzn.to/1eOKUCT Today is the Day Pocket Planner by Jessica Hische.
The Today is the Day pocket planner looks like those old hardcover books with gold lettered-titles.
Lettering and illustrations are byJessica Hische.
The Art Deco-inspired interior planner pages include full-page typographical illustrations of quotations by Emily Dickinson (“Forever is Composed of Nows”), Emily Bronte (“I’ve dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me”), John Gardner, Anthony D’Angelo, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and others.
The spine reminds you to “write every day”, and the back cover exhorts you to make it happen.
See the details of this beautiful book here: http://amzn.to/1eOKUCT

Today is the Day Pocket Planner by Jessica Hische.

The Today is the Day pocket planner looks like those old hardcover books with gold lettered-titles.

Lettering and illustrations are byJessica Hische.

The Art Deco-inspired interior planner pages include full-page typographical illustrations of quotations by Emily Dickinson (“Forever is Composed of Nows”), Emily Bronte (“I’ve dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me”), John Gardner, Anthony D’Angelo, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and others.

The spine reminds you to “write every day”, and the back cover exhorts you to make it happen.

See the details of this beautiful book here: http://amzn.to/1eOKUCT



Penguin Drop Caps Series by Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley.
Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley have collaborated on an exciting new project, a series of cover designs for classic literature featuring Jessica’s Drop Caps. The first six titles, below, look pretty amazing.
Pride And Prejudice by Jane Auesten.
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte.
My Antonia by Willa Cather.
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens.
Middlemarch by George Eliot.
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert.
Lord of the Flies by William Golding.
Check you favorite one here: http://amzn.to/KcgDnT Penguin Drop Caps Series by Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley.
Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley have collaborated on an exciting new project, a series of cover designs for classic literature featuring Jessica’s Drop Caps. The first six titles, below, look pretty amazing.
Pride And Prejudice by Jane Auesten.
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte.
My Antonia by Willa Cather.
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens.
Middlemarch by George Eliot.
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert.
Lord of the Flies by William Golding.
Check you favorite one here: http://amzn.to/KcgDnT Penguin Drop Caps Series by Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley.
Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley have collaborated on an exciting new project, a series of cover designs for classic literature featuring Jessica’s Drop Caps. The first six titles, below, look pretty amazing.
Pride And Prejudice by Jane Auesten.
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte.
My Antonia by Willa Cather.
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens.
Middlemarch by George Eliot.
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert.
Lord of the Flies by William Golding.
Check you favorite one here: http://amzn.to/KcgDnT Penguin Drop Caps Series by Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley.
Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley have collaborated on an exciting new project, a series of cover designs for classic literature featuring Jessica’s Drop Caps. The first six titles, below, look pretty amazing.
Pride And Prejudice by Jane Auesten.
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte.
My Antonia by Willa Cather.
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens.
Middlemarch by George Eliot.
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert.
Lord of the Flies by William Golding.
Check you favorite one here: http://amzn.to/KcgDnT Penguin Drop Caps Series by Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley.
Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley have collaborated on an exciting new project, a series of cover designs for classic literature featuring Jessica’s Drop Caps. The first six titles, below, look pretty amazing.
Pride And Prejudice by Jane Auesten.
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte.
My Antonia by Willa Cather.
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens.
Middlemarch by George Eliot.
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert.
Lord of the Flies by William Golding.
Check you favorite one here: http://amzn.to/KcgDnT Penguin Drop Caps Series by Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley.
Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley have collaborated on an exciting new project, a series of cover designs for classic literature featuring Jessica’s Drop Caps. The first six titles, below, look pretty amazing.
Pride And Prejudice by Jane Auesten.
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte.
My Antonia by Willa Cather.
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens.
Middlemarch by George Eliot.
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert.
Lord of the Flies by William Golding.
Check you favorite one here: http://amzn.to/KcgDnT Penguin Drop Caps Series by Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley.
Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley have collaborated on an exciting new project, a series of cover designs for classic literature featuring Jessica’s Drop Caps. The first six titles, below, look pretty amazing.
Pride And Prejudice by Jane Auesten.
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte.
My Antonia by Willa Cather.
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens.
Middlemarch by George Eliot.
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert.
Lord of the Flies by William Golding.
Check you favorite one here: http://amzn.to/KcgDnT Penguin Drop Caps Series by Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley.
Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley have collaborated on an exciting new project, a series of cover designs for classic literature featuring Jessica’s Drop Caps. The first six titles, below, look pretty amazing.
Pride And Prejudice by Jane Auesten.
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte.
My Antonia by Willa Cather.
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens.
Middlemarch by George Eliot.
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert.
Lord of the Flies by William Golding.
Check you favorite one here: http://amzn.to/KcgDnT Penguin Drop Caps Series by Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley.
Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley have collaborated on an exciting new project, a series of cover designs for classic literature featuring Jessica’s Drop Caps. The first six titles, below, look pretty amazing.
Pride And Prejudice by Jane Auesten.
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte.
My Antonia by Willa Cather.
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens.
Middlemarch by George Eliot.
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert.
Lord of the Flies by William Golding.
Check you favorite one here: http://amzn.to/KcgDnT

Penguin Drop Caps Series by Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley.

Jessica Hische and Paul Buckley have collaborated on an exciting new project, a series of cover designs for classic literature featuring Jessica’s Drop Caps. The first six titles, below, look pretty amazing.

Check you favorite one here: http://amzn.to/KcgDnT



Scripts: Elegant Lettering from Design’s Golden Age
“No one person ever invented an alphabet,” wrote Type-maven Tommy Thompson. Script typefaces were no exception. During the letterpress era they were in such great demand that many people “invented” them, and many others copied them. In some commercial printing shops, composing cases filled with scripts were stacked floor to ceiling to the exclusion of other type. Printers routinely amassed multiple styles of the heavy metal type fonts, each possessing a distinct twist, flourish or quirk, used to inject the hint of personality or dash of character to quotidian printed pieces. Fonts had names like Wedding Plate Script, Cursive Script, Engravers Script, Bank Script, Master Script, French Script, Stationers Semiscript and Myrtle Script — Myrtle? — there were countless others. They surfaced in Europe and America. And the exact same types in France, for example, could be found in Italian foundries with different names.Scripts signaled propriety, suggested authority yet also exuded status and a bourgeois aesthetic. The wealthy classes couldn’t get enough fashionable scripts in their diet. Likewise, the nouveau riche embraced them too — maybe it helped them to appear even more wealthy. 
Seen in everything from wedding invitations and birth announcements to IOUs, menus, and diplomas, script typefaces impart elegance and sophistication to a broad variety of texts. Scripts never go out of style, and the hundreds of inventive examples here are sure to inspire today’s designers. Derived from handwriting, these are typefaces that are stylized to suggest, imply, or symbolize certain traits linked to writing. Their fundamental characteristic is that all the letters, more or less, touch those before and after. Drawn from the Golden Age of scripts, from the nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century, this is the first compilation of popular, rare, and forgotten scripts from the United States, Germany, France, England, and Italy. Featuring examples from a vast spectrum of sources—advertisements, street signs, type-specimen books, and personal letters—this book is a delightful and invaluable trove of longoverlooked material. 275 illustrations, 254 in color
USA: http://amzn.to/18ou7s9UK: http://amzn.to/18F7HOd Scripts: Elegant Lettering from Design’s Golden Age
“No one person ever invented an alphabet,” wrote Type-maven Tommy Thompson. Script typefaces were no exception. During the letterpress era they were in such great demand that many people “invented” them, and many others copied them. In some commercial printing shops, composing cases filled with scripts were stacked floor to ceiling to the exclusion of other type. Printers routinely amassed multiple styles of the heavy metal type fonts, each possessing a distinct twist, flourish or quirk, used to inject the hint of personality or dash of character to quotidian printed pieces. Fonts had names like Wedding Plate Script, Cursive Script, Engravers Script, Bank Script, Master Script, French Script, Stationers Semiscript and Myrtle Script — Myrtle? — there were countless others. They surfaced in Europe and America. And the exact same types in France, for example, could be found in Italian foundries with different names.Scripts signaled propriety, suggested authority yet also exuded status and a bourgeois aesthetic. The wealthy classes couldn’t get enough fashionable scripts in their diet. Likewise, the nouveau riche embraced them too — maybe it helped them to appear even more wealthy. 
Seen in everything from wedding invitations and birth announcements to IOUs, menus, and diplomas, script typefaces impart elegance and sophistication to a broad variety of texts. Scripts never go out of style, and the hundreds of inventive examples here are sure to inspire today’s designers. Derived from handwriting, these are typefaces that are stylized to suggest, imply, or symbolize certain traits linked to writing. Their fundamental characteristic is that all the letters, more or less, touch those before and after. Drawn from the Golden Age of scripts, from the nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century, this is the first compilation of popular, rare, and forgotten scripts from the United States, Germany, France, England, and Italy. Featuring examples from a vast spectrum of sources—advertisements, street signs, type-specimen books, and personal letters—this book is a delightful and invaluable trove of longoverlooked material. 275 illustrations, 254 in color
USA: http://amzn.to/18ou7s9UK: http://amzn.to/18F7HOd Scripts: Elegant Lettering from Design’s Golden Age
“No one person ever invented an alphabet,” wrote Type-maven Tommy Thompson. Script typefaces were no exception. During the letterpress era they were in such great demand that many people “invented” them, and many others copied them. In some commercial printing shops, composing cases filled with scripts were stacked floor to ceiling to the exclusion of other type. Printers routinely amassed multiple styles of the heavy metal type fonts, each possessing a distinct twist, flourish or quirk, used to inject the hint of personality or dash of character to quotidian printed pieces. Fonts had names like Wedding Plate Script, Cursive Script, Engravers Script, Bank Script, Master Script, French Script, Stationers Semiscript and Myrtle Script — Myrtle? — there were countless others. They surfaced in Europe and America. And the exact same types in France, for example, could be found in Italian foundries with different names.Scripts signaled propriety, suggested authority yet also exuded status and a bourgeois aesthetic. The wealthy classes couldn’t get enough fashionable scripts in their diet. Likewise, the nouveau riche embraced them too — maybe it helped them to appear even more wealthy. 
Seen in everything from wedding invitations and birth announcements to IOUs, menus, and diplomas, script typefaces impart elegance and sophistication to a broad variety of texts. Scripts never go out of style, and the hundreds of inventive examples here are sure to inspire today’s designers. Derived from handwriting, these are typefaces that are stylized to suggest, imply, or symbolize certain traits linked to writing. Their fundamental characteristic is that all the letters, more or less, touch those before and after. Drawn from the Golden Age of scripts, from the nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century, this is the first compilation of popular, rare, and forgotten scripts from the United States, Germany, France, England, and Italy. Featuring examples from a vast spectrum of sources—advertisements, street signs, type-specimen books, and personal letters—this book is a delightful and invaluable trove of longoverlooked material. 275 illustrations, 254 in color
USA: http://amzn.to/18ou7s9UK: http://amzn.to/18F7HOd Scripts: Elegant Lettering from Design’s Golden Age
“No one person ever invented an alphabet,” wrote Type-maven Tommy Thompson. Script typefaces were no exception. During the letterpress era they were in such great demand that many people “invented” them, and many others copied them. In some commercial printing shops, composing cases filled with scripts were stacked floor to ceiling to the exclusion of other type. Printers routinely amassed multiple styles of the heavy metal type fonts, each possessing a distinct twist, flourish or quirk, used to inject the hint of personality or dash of character to quotidian printed pieces. Fonts had names like Wedding Plate Script, Cursive Script, Engravers Script, Bank Script, Master Script, French Script, Stationers Semiscript and Myrtle Script — Myrtle? — there were countless others. They surfaced in Europe and America. And the exact same types in France, for example, could be found in Italian foundries with different names.Scripts signaled propriety, suggested authority yet also exuded status and a bourgeois aesthetic. The wealthy classes couldn’t get enough fashionable scripts in their diet. Likewise, the nouveau riche embraced them too — maybe it helped them to appear even more wealthy. 
Seen in everything from wedding invitations and birth announcements to IOUs, menus, and diplomas, script typefaces impart elegance and sophistication to a broad variety of texts. Scripts never go out of style, and the hundreds of inventive examples here are sure to inspire today’s designers. Derived from handwriting, these are typefaces that are stylized to suggest, imply, or symbolize certain traits linked to writing. Their fundamental characteristic is that all the letters, more or less, touch those before and after. Drawn from the Golden Age of scripts, from the nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century, this is the first compilation of popular, rare, and forgotten scripts from the United States, Germany, France, England, and Italy. Featuring examples from a vast spectrum of sources—advertisements, street signs, type-specimen books, and personal letters—this book is a delightful and invaluable trove of longoverlooked material. 275 illustrations, 254 in color
USA: http://amzn.to/18ou7s9UK: http://amzn.to/18F7HOd

Scripts: Elegant Lettering from Design’s Golden Age

No one person ever invented an alphabet,” wrote Type-maven Tommy Thompson. Script typefaces were no exception. During the letterpress era they were in such great demand that many people “invented” them, and many others copied them. In some commercial printing shops, composing cases filled with scripts were stacked floor to ceiling to the exclusion of other type. Printers routinely amassed multiple styles of the heavy metal type fonts, each possessing a distinct twist, flourish or quirk, used to inject the hint of personality or dash of character to quotidian printed pieces. Fonts had names like Wedding Plate Script, Cursive Script, Engravers Script, Bank Script, Master Script, French Script, Stationers Semiscript and Myrtle Script — Myrtle? — there were countless others. They surfaced in Europe and America. And the exact same types in France, for example, could be found in Italian foundries with different names.

Scripts signaled propriety, suggested authority yet also exuded status and a bourgeois aesthetic. The wealthy classes couldn’t get enough fashionable scripts in their diet. Likewise, the nouveau riche embraced them too — maybe it helped them to appear even more wealthy. 

Seen in everything from wedding invitations and birth announcements to IOUs, menus, and diplomas, script typefaces impart elegance and sophistication to a broad variety of texts. Scripts never go out of style, and the hundreds of inventive examples here are sure to inspire today’s designers. Derived from handwriting, these are typefaces that are stylized to suggest, imply, or symbolize certain traits linked to writing. Their fundamental characteristic is that all the letters, more or less, touch those before and after. Drawn from the Golden Age of scripts, from the nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century, this is the first compilation of popular, rare, and forgotten scripts from the United States, Germany, France, England, and Italy. Featuring examples from a vast spectrum of sources—advertisements, street signs, type-specimen books, and personal letters—this book is a delightful and invaluable trove of longoverlooked material. 275 illustrations, 254 in color

USA: http://amzn.to/18ou7s9
UK: http://amzn.to/18F7HOd



The Calligraphy Post.
A few days ago I bought a course "Introduction of the Art of Modern Calligraphy" by Molly Jacques, which you should definitely check, and I fell in love with calligraphy.
Now I find this useful infographic with the basics of calligraphy, including tools. In case you want to try your skills you should try to do those exercise. 
In both cases, (the classes from molly and this infographic) they ask you simple tools to begining your training:
Pen Holder
Nikko G pointed, 303 and 404 Nibs (but you can find packs including pen holder like this one)
Black ink
Semi Transparent Layout Bound (recommend by Molly)
Calligraphy Lined Guide (optional)
Books.
In case you’re most an analog vintage retro-old guy, and you prefer to read a real book that stuck your nose in a monitor these are cool option for calligraphy beginners (the last to images):
Modern Calligraphy: Everything You Need to Know to Get Started in Script Calligraphy.
Mastering Copperplate Calligraphy: A Step-by-Step Manual
Here are the last useful links:
In case you’re lazy or calligraphy simple isn’t your thing download the font (used on this post): http://myfonts.us/8eK7dW
The Class of Molly Jacques: http://skl.sh/1bWpr9p
Source of the infographic: us.moo.com The Calligraphy Post.
A few days ago I bought a course "Introduction of the Art of Modern Calligraphy" by Molly Jacques, which you should definitely check, and I fell in love with calligraphy.
Now I find this useful infographic with the basics of calligraphy, including tools. In case you want to try your skills you should try to do those exercise. 
In both cases, (the classes from molly and this infographic) they ask you simple tools to begining your training:
Pen Holder
Nikko G pointed, 303 and 404 Nibs (but you can find packs including pen holder like this one)
Black ink
Semi Transparent Layout Bound (recommend by Molly)
Calligraphy Lined Guide (optional)
Books.
In case you’re most an analog vintage retro-old guy, and you prefer to read a real book that stuck your nose in a monitor these are cool option for calligraphy beginners (the last to images):
Modern Calligraphy: Everything You Need to Know to Get Started in Script Calligraphy.
Mastering Copperplate Calligraphy: A Step-by-Step Manual
Here are the last useful links:
In case you’re lazy or calligraphy simple isn’t your thing download the font (used on this post): http://myfonts.us/8eK7dW
The Class of Molly Jacques: http://skl.sh/1bWpr9p
Source of the infographic: us.moo.com The Calligraphy Post.
A few days ago I bought a course "Introduction of the Art of Modern Calligraphy" by Molly Jacques, which you should definitely check, and I fell in love with calligraphy.
Now I find this useful infographic with the basics of calligraphy, including tools. In case you want to try your skills you should try to do those exercise. 
In both cases, (the classes from molly and this infographic) they ask you simple tools to begining your training:
Pen Holder
Nikko G pointed, 303 and 404 Nibs (but you can find packs including pen holder like this one)
Black ink
Semi Transparent Layout Bound (recommend by Molly)
Calligraphy Lined Guide (optional)
Books.
In case you’re most an analog vintage retro-old guy, and you prefer to read a real book that stuck your nose in a monitor these are cool option for calligraphy beginners (the last to images):
Modern Calligraphy: Everything You Need to Know to Get Started in Script Calligraphy.
Mastering Copperplate Calligraphy: A Step-by-Step Manual
Here are the last useful links:
In case you’re lazy or calligraphy simple isn’t your thing download the font (used on this post): http://myfonts.us/8eK7dW
The Class of Molly Jacques: http://skl.sh/1bWpr9p
Source of the infographic: us.moo.com The Calligraphy Post.
A few days ago I bought a course "Introduction of the Art of Modern Calligraphy" by Molly Jacques, which you should definitely check, and I fell in love with calligraphy.
Now I find this useful infographic with the basics of calligraphy, including tools. In case you want to try your skills you should try to do those exercise. 
In both cases, (the classes from molly and this infographic) they ask you simple tools to begining your training:
Pen Holder
Nikko G pointed, 303 and 404 Nibs (but you can find packs including pen holder like this one)
Black ink
Semi Transparent Layout Bound (recommend by Molly)
Calligraphy Lined Guide (optional)
Books.
In case you’re most an analog vintage retro-old guy, and you prefer to read a real book that stuck your nose in a monitor these are cool option for calligraphy beginners (the last to images):
Modern Calligraphy: Everything You Need to Know to Get Started in Script Calligraphy.
Mastering Copperplate Calligraphy: A Step-by-Step Manual
Here are the last useful links:
In case you’re lazy or calligraphy simple isn’t your thing download the font (used on this post): http://myfonts.us/8eK7dW
The Class of Molly Jacques: http://skl.sh/1bWpr9p
Source of the infographic: us.moo.com The Calligraphy Post.
A few days ago I bought a course "Introduction of the Art of Modern Calligraphy" by Molly Jacques, which you should definitely check, and I fell in love with calligraphy.
Now I find this useful infographic with the basics of calligraphy, including tools. In case you want to try your skills you should try to do those exercise. 
In both cases, (the classes from molly and this infographic) they ask you simple tools to begining your training:
Pen Holder
Nikko G pointed, 303 and 404 Nibs (but you can find packs including pen holder like this one)
Black ink
Semi Transparent Layout Bound (recommend by Molly)
Calligraphy Lined Guide (optional)
Books.
In case you’re most an analog vintage retro-old guy, and you prefer to read a real book that stuck your nose in a monitor these are cool option for calligraphy beginners (the last to images):
Modern Calligraphy: Everything You Need to Know to Get Started in Script Calligraphy.
Mastering Copperplate Calligraphy: A Step-by-Step Manual
Here are the last useful links:
In case you’re lazy or calligraphy simple isn’t your thing download the font (used on this post): http://myfonts.us/8eK7dW
The Class of Molly Jacques: http://skl.sh/1bWpr9p
Source of the infographic: us.moo.com The Calligraphy Post.
A few days ago I bought a course "Introduction of the Art of Modern Calligraphy" by Molly Jacques, which you should definitely check, and I fell in love with calligraphy.
Now I find this useful infographic with the basics of calligraphy, including tools. In case you want to try your skills you should try to do those exercise. 
In both cases, (the classes from molly and this infographic) they ask you simple tools to begining your training:
Pen Holder
Nikko G pointed, 303 and 404 Nibs (but you can find packs including pen holder like this one)
Black ink
Semi Transparent Layout Bound (recommend by Molly)
Calligraphy Lined Guide (optional)
Books.
In case you’re most an analog vintage retro-old guy, and you prefer to read a real book that stuck your nose in a monitor these are cool option for calligraphy beginners (the last to images):
Modern Calligraphy: Everything You Need to Know to Get Started in Script Calligraphy.
Mastering Copperplate Calligraphy: A Step-by-Step Manual
Here are the last useful links:
In case you’re lazy or calligraphy simple isn’t your thing download the font (used on this post): http://myfonts.us/8eK7dW
The Class of Molly Jacques: http://skl.sh/1bWpr9p
Source of the infographic: us.moo.com The Calligraphy Post.
A few days ago I bought a course "Introduction of the Art of Modern Calligraphy" by Molly Jacques, which you should definitely check, and I fell in love with calligraphy.
Now I find this useful infographic with the basics of calligraphy, including tools. In case you want to try your skills you should try to do those exercise. 
In both cases, (the classes from molly and this infographic) they ask you simple tools to begining your training:
Pen Holder
Nikko G pointed, 303 and 404 Nibs (but you can find packs including pen holder like this one)
Black ink
Semi Transparent Layout Bound (recommend by Molly)
Calligraphy Lined Guide (optional)
Books.
In case you’re most an analog vintage retro-old guy, and you prefer to read a real book that stuck your nose in a monitor these are cool option for calligraphy beginners (the last to images):
Modern Calligraphy: Everything You Need to Know to Get Started in Script Calligraphy.
Mastering Copperplate Calligraphy: A Step-by-Step Manual
Here are the last useful links:
In case you’re lazy or calligraphy simple isn’t your thing download the font (used on this post): http://myfonts.us/8eK7dW
The Class of Molly Jacques: http://skl.sh/1bWpr9p
Source of the infographic: us.moo.com The Calligraphy Post.
A few days ago I bought a course "Introduction of the Art of Modern Calligraphy" by Molly Jacques, which you should definitely check, and I fell in love with calligraphy.
Now I find this useful infographic with the basics of calligraphy, including tools. In case you want to try your skills you should try to do those exercise. 
In both cases, (the classes from molly and this infographic) they ask you simple tools to begining your training:
Pen Holder
Nikko G pointed, 303 and 404 Nibs (but you can find packs including pen holder like this one)
Black ink
Semi Transparent Layout Bound (recommend by Molly)
Calligraphy Lined Guide (optional)
Books.
In case you’re most an analog vintage retro-old guy, and you prefer to read a real book that stuck your nose in a monitor these are cool option for calligraphy beginners (the last to images):
Modern Calligraphy: Everything You Need to Know to Get Started in Script Calligraphy.
Mastering Copperplate Calligraphy: A Step-by-Step Manual
Here are the last useful links:
In case you’re lazy or calligraphy simple isn’t your thing download the font (used on this post): http://myfonts.us/8eK7dW
The Class of Molly Jacques: http://skl.sh/1bWpr9p
Source of the infographic: us.moo.com The Calligraphy Post.
A few days ago I bought a course "Introduction of the Art of Modern Calligraphy" by Molly Jacques, which you should definitely check, and I fell in love with calligraphy.
Now I find this useful infographic with the basics of calligraphy, including tools. In case you want to try your skills you should try to do those exercise. 
In both cases, (the classes from molly and this infographic) they ask you simple tools to begining your training:
Pen Holder
Nikko G pointed, 303 and 404 Nibs (but you can find packs including pen holder like this one)
Black ink
Semi Transparent Layout Bound (recommend by Molly)
Calligraphy Lined Guide (optional)
Books.
In case you’re most an analog vintage retro-old guy, and you prefer to read a real book that stuck your nose in a monitor these are cool option for calligraphy beginners (the last to images):
Modern Calligraphy: Everything You Need to Know to Get Started in Script Calligraphy.
Mastering Copperplate Calligraphy: A Step-by-Step Manual
Here are the last useful links:
In case you’re lazy or calligraphy simple isn’t your thing download the font (used on this post): http://myfonts.us/8eK7dW
The Class of Molly Jacques: http://skl.sh/1bWpr9p
Source of the infographic: us.moo.com

The Calligraphy Post.

A few days ago I bought a course "Introduction of the Art of Modern Calligraphy" by Molly Jacques, which you should definitely check, and I fell in love with calligraphy.

Now I find this useful infographic with the basics of calligraphy, including tools. In case you want to try your skills you should try to do those exercise. 

In both cases, (the classes from molly and this infographic) they ask you simple tools to begining your training:

Books.

In case you’re most an analog vintage retro-old guy, and you prefer to read a real book that stuck your nose in a monitor these are cool option for calligraphy beginners (the last to images):

Here are the last useful links:

In case you’re lazy or calligraphy simple isn’t your thing download the font (used on this post): http://myfonts.us/8eK7dW

The Class of Molly Jacques: http://skl.sh/1bWpr9p

Source of the infographic: us.moo.com



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